Friday, April 28, 2017

April Updates

It's been a while since I posted one of my update posts, so I thought I would share a bit of what I've been up to...including an announcement about a new story that almost no one knows about. :-D


Reading


As usual, I keep a regular log of what I'm currently reading on Goodreads. Probably the book I'm most excited about at the moment is something I'm reading as part of this stage of work on OUTREMER: Healer of the Nations by Gary North. It's a brilliantly insightful book on international relations from a Christian perspective, and as I take a step back to look at the history I've been learning and try to evaluate the ins and outs, the rights and wrongs of it all, this specific book has been incredibly helpful. How ought Christian nations to relate to each other and to nations of other persuasions? Is there any truth in nationalism or internationalism, and what do Christians have to say about such things? These are questions that most Christians don't even think of asking, and this book, despite bearing the stamp of the times when it was written (before the collapse of the Soviet Union), has been extremely helpful to me in thinking through the issues involved in the history I've been learning.

It's available from the publisher as a free PDF here.


Watching


As part of the preparation for the second draft of Ten Thousand Thorns (more on that in a minute), I went back and watched on of my favourite wuxia films. Reign of Assassins isn't one of those serious arthouse wuxia films, like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon or Hero. Instead, it's much closer to the wuxia books I read a while back: a preposterous, swashbuckling tale of ordinary people having extraordinary adventures. The always queenly Michelle Yeoh plays Drizzle, a deadly assassin who after accidentally killing the man she loves, seeks redemption in a quiet life as a street vendor in Nanjing. The Polearm Guy from Musa (Woo-sung Jeong) plays the goofy errand-runner who's sweet on her. Drizzle's former colleagues, in search for a powerful Buddhist relic that disappeared when she did, are determined to get their revenge for her defection. Will Drizzle ever be able to leave her life of violence behind her? Or is her newfound happiness about to meet an ugly end?

Although I found the ending of the film a little unsatisfying (one character gives up his revenge for no discernible reason), overall this is a charming story. I would, however, highly recommend pairing it with (ex Zen monk) Ellis Potter's book 3 Theories of Everything, which will explain the Buddhist worldview behind the film, and its preoccupation with domesticity, nature, and the small, quiet arts.


Listening


Last time I posted these updates I was listening to My Soul Among Lions, and right now I'm listening to them again, some more. Volume 2 of their ambitious project to record all 150 Psalms in a country/folk style, covering Psalms 11-20, was released just a few weeks ago and I've been listening to it over and over. As with the first album, some of the renditions are more successful than others (Psalm 18 is perhaps a little too long to fit into one track?) but overall, I'm enjoying this second album even more - particularly their Psalms 14 and 20.


Writing


So, here's the part you've been waiting for. *rubs hands*

This month I have been working on the second draft of Ten Thousand Thorns, my retelling of Sleeping Beauty as a homage to wuxia. It's coming together nicely, but looks like being the longest of my novellas so far. Because of the wordcount (potentially 35,000 words, give or take), I'm not sure how much longer I'll be finishing the second draft - but I'm looking forward to sending it to beta readers, hopefully early next month! No other story I've ever written has ever made me smile so hard, so it's been a real pleasure to work on.

The other project I'm working on this month is OUTREMER, you'll all be pleased to know. I've been fidgeting with it since the beginning of the year, and my task this month was to take a step back and do some evaluation of the ethical issues in the history. As an author, my job is, in part, to pass judgement on people's actions. Should I depict Balian of Ibelin and Maria Comnena's decision to force their daughter Isabella to divorce Hopeless Humphrey of Toron as a good or a bad thing, for instance? And what about the decision to march East on crusade at all? It's been a great time for me to challenge some of my existing assumptions, and to be a little more critical of some of what I've been reading in the history books--and a completely exciting time to think about the hand of Providence in these events. At this stage, my hope is to begin writing the second draft in the second half of this year.

And! Here's something you don't know: Last month I had a lot of fun writing the first draft of a whole new fairytale retelling. This one is titled The City Beyond the Glass, and it's a retelling of The Twelve Dancing Princesses in Renaissance Venice, in...well, its own style, really, though it did grow out of my fascination with Rosamund Hodge. I don't think I've ever written such overtly unpleasant characters as the ones in this story, so it was a terrific challenge. 

I didn't tell you about it at the time because of the Death Be Not Proud paperback release (did you get your copy yet? Schuyler of My Lady Bibliophile called it, and I quote, "to die for"). As always, if you've already read Death Be Not Proud and have not already done so, please do consider leaving a short review at Amazon.

And actually, I have another review request. I recently put together my four existing fairytale novellas in a boxset of their own. If you have read all my fairytale novellas, would you consider leaving a short review of that as well? It would be a very substantial help. And as always, if you haven't read the existing novellas, shoot me an email and I will be very happy to shower you with free review copies!

5 comments:

Elisabeth Grace Foley said...

Wait, I didn't know about this one! It was a different retelling you mentioned before (think swashbuckler), and even though you've referenced Renaissance Venice recently, I mistakenly thought they were both the same story. The more stories, the merrier! :)

Hayden said...

ooooh Venice and princesses! Can't wait! (Although I'm *really* impatient for that one Elisabeth mentioned... *cough* swashbuckler *cough*)

Also, you've made me want to watch wuxia films. I'd never even heard of them before your Ten Thousand Thorns posts, but now I think I need to check some out.

Suzannah said...

Elisabeth - Oh! Well, there's surprise for you :). I'm really happy about this one - I think it's going to be particularly good.

Hayden - LADY DISDAIN is still tucked away in first-draft form, waiting its turn :). I haven't touched it since finishing the first draft late last year, and I have a (probably false) impression that it's a complete mess, but that will definitely be getting a second draft next, though I'm not sure just when.

Meanwhile I do recommend seeing some wuxia films! They are basically knight-errant/swashbuckler stories translated to the East. Let me know what you think :)

Jamie W said...

Now I have to wonder whether "Hopeless Humphrey of Toron" is a historical epithet or a Suzannah-epithet!

Suzannah said...

Jamie - LOL! Wonder no longer...it's definitely a Suzannah-epithet. Hopelessness does, however, seem to be the consensus. Some modern historians go so far as to state that Humphrey was homosexual, but after reading a bunch of the primary sources I can't see how they get that, except as a potential explanation for his wondrous gormlessness.

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